Protecting Los Cedros Cloud Forest Reserve

Championed by:  John Seed

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$5,000

target

$125  raised
$4,875 needed

This project has completed

Deadline  31 January 2015

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about the project

Protecting Los Cedros Cloud Forest Reserve

John Seed

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Los Cedros Biological Reserve is 6,800 hectares of wet tropical forest and cloud forest located in Choco region northwest Ecuador, one of the most biologically diverse habitats on Earth.

The reserve is a southern buffer zone for the 180,000 hectare Cotocachi-Cayapas Ecological Reserve. It was founded in 1988 with the purchase of land to conserve the forest and wildlife made possible with the help of numerous individuals and organisations, especially the Rainforest Information Center of Australia (RIC).

         

Throughout the years Los Cedros has counted on RIC for the ongoing support of the ongoing efforts to conserve this biological treasure as the reserve is continually threatened by invasions by squatters requiring rapid interventions to stop illegal logging and clearing.

We need just $5,000 to secure the reserve for the next 12 months. That money will now cover the costs of patrols by conservationists, risking their lives on the ground, to confront and report illegal encroachment and put a halt to the illegal logging of protected tropicaland cloud forest in Ecuador.

           

PLEASE HELP US TO STOP AN INVASION OF ILLEGAL LOGGING AND LAND CLEARING IN THE LOS CEDROS BIOLOGICAL RESERVE IN THE MOST BIODIVERSE PLACE ON EARTH - THE AMAZON HEADWATERS OF ECUADOR.

         

Los Cedros is the focus on a new documentary short film that documents and celebrates its unique wildlife and the struggle to understand and protect Ecuador's last intact forested catchment from illegal logging and degradation. View trailer:

Please make a tax-deductible donation to this special appeal to secure Los Cedros Biological Reserve.

It is estimated that there are around 240 species of birds in the Los Cedros Biological Reserve. Tanagers, Hawks, Eagles, Parrots, Owls, and Toucans to name but a few. Over a dozen species of hummingbirds whizz around throughout the forest, some only an inch long. The stunning Andean Cock-of-the-Rock, the Toucan Barbett, and the colourful Golden Headed Quetzal make their home here.

               

Encompassing thousands of species, the invertebrates dominate the faunal biomass. In Los Cedros there are over 900 species of nocturnal moths, most with amazing wing patterns and colours. There are also thousands of species of butterflies, ants, beetles, spiders, and bees. The reserve is also home to several species each of snakes, lizards and frogs which are often seen, but have been little researched.

Evidence in the form of scat, tracks, and the occasional sighting provide the assurance that our five species of felines roam their territories here in the reserve. Common names are the Jaguarundi, Margay, Oncilla, Puma, and Jaguar. In the morning, along with the chorus of birds, you are likely to be woken by the Mantled Howler Monkey. He is the loudest, so can often be heard, and sometimes seen, in the canopy. The two other primates are the White-Throated Capuchins and the rare Brown-Headed Spider Monkey. The only species of South American bear, the Spectacled Bear, inhabits the higher elevations of the reserve and is seen on occasion.

          

Other mammals include the Opossum, Nine-Banded Armadillo, Kinkajou, Tayra, Southern River Otter, Collared Peccary, Red Brocket Deer, Paca, Agouti, Spiny Pocket Mouse, Bicolo-Spined Porcupine, Western Dwarf Squirrel, and Red-Tailed Squirrel.

Abundant tree species include Copal, Madrono, Avocatillo, Strangler Fig and Podocarpus, while the Cedars that give the reserve its name are less numerous. Fifty more trees have been identified, but this represents only a small fraction of the diversity present in the area. The dense forest floor and understory is a thick web of buttress roots, lianas, vines, prop roots, drop roots, and decomposing plant material. Characteristic of a cloud forest, the trees on the ridge lines are more stunted in size and laden with masses of luxuriant ephiphytes, with a more open canopy allowing a thicker and richer understory.

Also strong through the upper story are climbing philodendrons, bromeliads, heliconia, and cyclanthaceae. The area is especially rich in orchidaceae, with 190 species identified, with a predicted (by Cal Dodson) 200 yet to be discovered.

PLEASE HELP US TO STOP AN INVASION OF ILLEGAL LOGGING AND LAND CLEARING IN THE LOS CEDROS BIOLOGICAL RESERVE IN THE MOST BIODIVERSE PLACE ON EARTH - THE AMAZON HEADWATERS OF ECUADOR.

          

Please make a donation to this special appeal to secure Los Cedros Biological Reserve.

Thank you!

John Seed, Founder, Rainforest Information Centre

           


comments

Keep up the vital work John! Love Megan

-  Megan Kearney

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